Conditions covered by TreatGx

Medications are taken to treat, or reduce the symptoms of a condition or disease. To choose the most appropriate medication it is important to know the reason for taking that medication, including which condition or disease it is being taken for. TreatGx starts by considering your condition, disease state or diagnosis. TreatGx is expanding and more conditions and medications are being added to the platform.

Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. Feelings of anxiety can interfere with daily activities such as job performance, school work, and relationships. There are several different types of anxiety disorders. Examples include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder.

Treatment

Anxiety disorders are generally treated with psychotherapy, medication, or both.

Medications for the treatment of anxiety disorders include:

  • Citalopram
  • Duloxetine
  • Escitalopram
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Moclobemide
  • Paroxetine
  • Pregabalin
  • Sertraline
  • Venlafaxine

Asthma

Asthma is an inflammatory disease of the airways that causes shortness of breath, a feeling of tightness in the chest, coughing and wheezing.

Treatment

Treatment for asthma may include taking medication. Most people with asthma will have two kinds of medication, controllers (also known as preventers), and relievers.

The controllers include:

  • Budesonide (Pulmicort)
  • Beclomethasone diprioprionate (Qvar)
  • Fluticasone proprionate (Advair, Flovent)
  • Mometasone furoate (Asmanex)
  • Ciclesonide (Alvesco)
  • Salmeterol (Serevent)
  • Formoterol fumarate (Foradil)
  • Formoterol fumurate dehydrate (Zenhale)
  • Prednisone
  • Theophylline (Theo, Uniphyl)
  • Oxtriphylline

The relievers include:

  • Salbutamol (Ventolin, Airomir)
  • Terbutaline (Bricanyl)
  • Ipratropium Bromide (Atrovent)

Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation is a condition where the heart beats in an irregular rhythm. The heart is a muscular organ consisting of four parts, or chambers, that pump blood through the blood vessels. The pumping mechanism that causes the “heart beat” is regulated by electrical activity in the top chambers of the heart, the atria. A person with atrial fibrillation has abnormal/disorganised electrical activity in the atria, causing the heart beat to be very fast and irregular. More information can be found at the Heart and Stroke Foundation website.

Treatment

Treatment of atrial fibrillation is aimed at decreasing symptoms and reducing complications. Medications may be prescribed to control your heart rate, control the rhythm of your heart or to reduce your chance of having a stroke.

Medications to control your heart rate include:

  • Atenolol
  • Bisoprolol
  • Metoprolol (Lopresor)
  • Nadolol
  • Propranolol (Inderal)
  • Diltiazem (Cardizem, Tiazac)
  • Verapamil (Isoptin)
  • Digoxin (Lanoxin)
  • Amiodarone (Codarone)

Medications to reduce complications are called anticoagulants (blood thinners), they include:

  • Acetylsalicylic acid, often called ASA (Aspirin, Entrophen, Novasen)
  • Apixaban (Eliquis)
  • Dabigatran (Pradaxa)
  • Rivaroxaban (Xarelto)
  • Warfarin (Coumadin)

Depression

Depression is a complex condition with diverse symptoms. Being depressed is different from experiencing the “blues”. People who are depressed experience symptoms over a long period of time; these symptoms may include: Continuous low mood or sadness, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, low self-esteem, tearfulness, irritability, and lack of motivation or interest in things.

Treatment

The goal of treatment for depression is to achieve relief from the symptoms of depression, and more importantly not just getting better, but staying better. The type of treatment your healthcare professional recommends will be based on the type of depression you have, medication is only one option for treatment of depression and not suitable for all.

Medications for the treatment of depression include:

  • Bupropion (Wellbutrin)
  • Citalopram (Celexa)
  • Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq)
  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta)
  • Escitalopram (Cipralex)
  • Fluoxetine (Prozac)
  • Fluvoxamine (Luvox)
  • Mirtazapine (Remeron)
  • Moclobemide (Manerix)
  • Paroxetine (Paxil)
  • Quetiapine (Seroquel)
  • Sertraline (Zoloft)
  • Trazodone (Oleptro)
  • Venlafaxine (Effexor)

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood that occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin or doesn’t use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of glucose in the blood. Initially the body may try to correct this by increasing the production of insulin, but over time the body is less able to meet this demand and the level of glucose in the blood remains high. Some people may experience a combination of tiredness, frequent urination (peeing), unusual feelings of thirst, or unexpected weight loss. Having high levels of glucose in the blood can lead to complications such as damage to the heart, eyes, and kidneys. The goal for treatment is to lower the level of sugar in the blood and thereby prevent complications.

Treatment

Treatment of diabetes depends your glucose levels; medication is not always necessary. Lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy diet and being active, are very important for people with Type 2 diabetes.

Medications for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes include:

  • Metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Glycon)
  • Glyburide (Diabeta)
  • Gliclazide (Diamicron)
  • Glimepiride (Amaryl)
  • Linagliptin (Trajenta)
  • Sitagliptin (Januvia)
  • Saxagliptin (Onglyza)
  • Alogliptin (Nesina)
  • Liraglutide (Victoza)
  • Exenatide (Byetta)
  • Pioglitazone (Actos)
  • Repaglinide (Gluconorm)
  • Empagliflozin (Jardiance)
  • Dapagliflozin (Forxiga)
  • Canagliflozin (Invokana)
  • Insulin (Apidra, Humalog, Humulin, Lantus, Levemir, Novolin, Novorapid)

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is characterized by seizures, fits, or convulsions. The seizures appear differently depending on how the brain is affected and the degree of seizure experienced can vary significantly. For some people seizures appear as a gentle brief loss of attention, while others may have violent contractions of the arms and legs which last for more than 10 minutes. The goal of therapy is to prevent seizure recurrence.

Treatment

Treatment for epilepsy varies by type of seizure:generalized tonic-clonic, tonic or atonic, absence, myoclonic, or focal. More information on epilepsy can be found on the Epilepsy Canada website.

Medications for the treatment of epilepsy include:

  • Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
  • Ethosuximide (Zarontin)
  • Lamotrigine (Lamictal)
  • Levetiracetam (Keppra)
  • Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal)
  • Valproic acid (Depakene, Epival)
  • Topiramate (Topamax)

Gout

Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops in some people who have high levels of uric acid in the blood. Uric acid crystals form within joints, causing pain, tenderness, redness, warmth, and swelling. For many people, the first symptom of gout is excruciating pain and swelling in the big toe, but it may also appear in the ankle or knee.

Treatment

There are two aims of gout treatment. The first is to relieve the symptoms of gout during an attack, and the second is to prevent more attacks occurring by controlling the levels of uric acid in the body. Treatment for gout includes eating a healthy diet, eliminating or reducing purine-rich foods, managing your weight and being physically active. More information can be found at the Arthritis Foundation Website.

Medications for the treatment of acute gout include:

  • Naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn)
  • Indomethacin
  • Celecoxib (Celebrex)
  • Colchicine
  • Prednisone
  • Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (Solu-Medrol)
  • Methylprednisolone acetate (Depo-Medrol)
  • Triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog)
  • Triamcinolone hexacetonide (Aristospan)

Medications for the treatment of chronic gout include:

  • Colchicine
  • Naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn)
  • Indomethacin
  • Prednisone
  • Allopurinol (Zyloprim)
  • Febuxostat (Uloric)

Heart Failure – Chronic

Heart failure occurs when the heart becomes damaged, and is unable to pump enough blood to meet the body’s demand. There are many conditions that can damage or weaken the heart, such as a heart attack or high blood pressure. Minor exertion may cause someone with heart failure to experience discomfort and limitation to their normal physical activity. Although there is no cure for heart failure, managing high blood pressure and treating the cause of the heart failure can help slow the progression of the disease.

Treatment

Medications for treatment of heart failure include:

  • Captopril
  • Enalapril
  • Lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril)
  • Ramipril (Altace)
  • Trandolapril (Mavik)
  • Candesartan (Atacand)
  • Losartan (Cozaar)
  • Valsartan (Diovan)
  • Carvedilol
  • Bisoprolol
  • Metoprolol (Toprol-XL)
  • Eplerenone (Inspra)
  • Spironolactone (Aldactone)
  • Hydralazine
  • Digoxin (Lanoxin)

Heart Failure – Fluid Retention

The left and/or right side of the heart may fail resulting in a backup of fluid in the lungs and other parts of the body. A buildup of fluid in the ankles, feet, and legs can cause swelling. This buildup of fluid is called fluid retention. People with fluid retention may feel tired, be short of breath, have an irritating cough that does not go away, or appear confused.

Treatment

Medications may be suggested to manage both heart failure and fluid retention.

Medications for the treatment of fluid retention due to heart failure include:

  • Furosemide (Lasix)
  • Bumetanide (Burinex)
  • Hydrochlorothiazide (Urozide)
  • Chlorthalidone
  • Metolazone (Zaroxolyn)
  • Eplerenone (Inspra)
  • Spironolactone (Aldactone)
  • Ethacrynic acid (Edecrin

Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia is the term used to describe the condition of having too much fat (cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood. Having high levels of fat in the blood can lead to a blockage in the flow of blood around your body.

Treatment

Eating a healthy diet and increasing your level of activity are important first steps in lowering high cholesterol. For some people, lifestyle changes may not be enough to lower the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. If so, your health care professional will probably recommend medication.

Medications for the treatment of hyperlipidemia include:

  • Atorvastatin (Lipitor)
  • Rosuvastatin (Crestor)
  • Pravastatin (Pravachol)
  • Simvastatin (Zocor)

Hypertension

People with high blood pressure (hypertension) are often unaware of it and they rarely have noticeable symptoms. Your heart pumps blood around your body to deliver energy and oxygen. A certain amount of pressure in your blood vessels is needed to do this. However, if there is too much pressure in your blood vessels, it puts extra strain on your arteries and heart, which can lead to serious conditions such as heart attack, heart failure, kidney disease, or stroke.

The only way of knowing there is a problem is to have your blood pressure checked. All adults should have their blood pressure checked regularly . Having this done is easy and could save your life.

Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and is recorded as two figures:

For example, if your physician says your blood pressure is “140 over 90”, or 140/90mmHg, it means you have a systolic pressure of 140mmHg and a diastolic pressure of 90mmHg.

Treatment

Treatment for hypertension includes changes to your lifestyle. Lifestyle changes include eating a healthy diet, which may include reducing salt, managing your weight, stopping smoking, and being physically active. You may be prescribed medications to keep your blood pressure within a range agreed with your health professional.

Medications for the treatment of hypertension include:

  • Enalapril
  • Lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril)
  • Ramipril (Altace)
  • Candesartan (Atacand)
  • Losartan (Cozaar)
  • Telmisartan (Micardis)
  • Amlodipine (Norvasc)
  • Felodipine (Plendil)
  • Nifedipine (Adalat)
  • Diltiazem (Cardizem, Tiazac)
  • Verapamil (Isoptin)
  • Chlorthalidone
  • Hydrochlorothiazide (Hydro, Urozide)
  • Indapamide (Lozide)
  • Metolazone (Zaroxolyn)
  • Acebutolol (Sectral)
  • Bisoprolol
  • Metoprolol (Lopresor)
  • Amiloride (Midamor)
  • Spironolactone (Aldactone)
  • Triamterene
  • Doxazosin (Cardura)
  • Terazosin (Hytrin)
  • Clonidine (Catapres, Dixarit)
  • Methyldopa

Migraine

A migraine is a severe headache that may be accompanied by nausea, vomiting and increased sensitivity to light or sound. There are several types of migraine, including:

  1. Migraine with aura. There are warning signs before the migraine begins, such as seeing flashing lights
  2. Migraine without aura. The migraine occurs without warning signs.
  3. Migraine aura without headache, also known as silent migraine. An aura or other migraine symptoms are experienced, but a headache does not develop.

Some people find migraine attacks are associated with certain triggers, which can include starting their period, stress, tiredness, and certain foods or drinks.

Treatment

There is no cure for migraines but medication can be used to treat the headaches when they occur. Avoiding things that trigger migraines can sometimes help reduce how often you get these headaches. Medication is also available to help prevent migraines, known as migraine prophylaxis. You may be prescribed these medications if you experience frequent or very severe migraine attacks.

Medications used in the treatment of migraine include:

  • Acetylsalicylic acid, often called ASA (Aspirin, Entrophen, Novasen)
  • Diclofenac Potassium (Voltaren)
  • Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
  • Naproxen Sodium (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan)
  • Almotriptan (Axert)
  • Eletriptan (Relpax)
  • Rizatriptan (Maxalt)
  • Sumatriptan (Imitrex)
  • Zolmitriptan (Zomig)
  • Dihydroergotamine

Medications used in the prevention of migraine (migraine prophylaxis) include:

  • Frovatriptan (Frova)
  • Propranolol (Inderal)
  • Timolol (Timoptic)
  • Topiramate (Topamax)
  • Divalproex (Epival)

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a common condition that causes joints to become stiff and painful. Almost any joint can be affected, but the most commonly affected are the knees, hips and hands. Osteoarthritis is a long-term condition and can’t be cured, but the pain and swelling can be improved with lifestyle changes and medications.

Treatment

A number of treatments are also available to reduce the symptoms. The main treatments for osteoarthritis include lifestyle changes, medication to relieve your pain, and supportive therapies to help make everyday activities easier. Topical creams, painkillers and injectable medications can be effective at managing osteoarthritis.. Certain pain-relieving medications may irritate your stomach, here for medications may also be suggested to help protect against this.

Medications used in the treatment of osteoarthritis include:

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
  • Betamethasone Sodium Phosphate
  • Betamethasone Acetate
  • Methylprednisolone Acetate (Depo-Medrol)
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide (Kenalog)
  • Morphine (Kadian, M-Eslon, Statex)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Jurnista)
  • Codeine
  • Tramadol (Durela, Ralivia, Ultram, Zytram)
  • Oxycodone (Oxyneo, Supeudol)
  • Capsaicin (Zuacta)
  • Zucapsaicin (Zuacta)
  • Diclofenac Diethylamine (Voltaren)
  • Diclofenac Sodium (Voltaren)
  • Naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn)
  • Celecoxib (Celebrex)
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
  • Ketoprofen

Medications used to reduce side effects of pain medication:

  • Famotidine (Acid Control, Pepcid)
  • Nizatidine (Axid)
  • Ranitidine (Acid Reducer, Zantac)
  • Esomeprazole (Nexium)
  • Lansoprazole (Prevacid)
  • Omeprazole (Olex)
  • Pantoprazole (Pantoloc, Tecta)
  • Rabeprazole (Pariet)
  • Misoprostol

Osteoporosis

Losing bone strength is a normal part of the ageing process, but for some people it can lead to osteoporosis and an increased risk of fractures. Wrist fractures, hip fractures, and fractures of the vertebrae (bones in the spine) are the most common type of bone breaks that affect people with osteoporosis. Osteoporosis often has no symptoms and may only be diagnosed after you have broken a bone.

Treatment

Treatment for osteoporosis is based using medication to strengthen bones and prevent fractures. Staying active and healthy – for example, through exercise and diet – is likely to keep you independent and reduce your risk of falling.

Medications used in the treatment of osteoporosis include:

  • Alendronate (Fosamax)
  • Risedronate (Actonel)
  • Zoledronic Acid (Aclasta, Zometa)
  • Etidronate (Didrocal)
  • Conjugated estrogen (Congest, Premarin)
  • Medroxyprogesterone (Medroxy, Provera)
  • Raloxifene (Evista)
  • Denosumab (Prolia, Xgeva)
  • Vitamin D3
  • Calcium

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by damage to arteries outside the heart, causing reduced blood flow to different parts of the body. It is also known as peripheral vascular disease. The reduced blood flow is usually due to fatty deposits within the arteries which results in narrowing or enlargement of the blood vessels. When this occurs in the arteries to the legs, a person may experience a painful ache in their legs when they walk, which usually disappears after a few minutes’ rest. This pain is known as intermittent claudication and usually develops in the calves but may be in the hip, buttock, or thigh muscles. Blockages in the arteries that cause PAD can also affect other areas of your body, such as the arteries supplying the heart and brain, which increases your risk of developing another form of cardiovascular disease.

Treatment

There is no cure for PAD, but lifestyle changes and medication can help reduce the symptoms.

Medications used for peripheral arterial disease include:

  • Acetylsalicylic acid, often called ASA (Aspirin, Entrophen, Novasen)
  • Clopidogrel (Plavix)

Persistent Pain

Persistent pain can be caused by many different conditions including neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, and chronic low back pain. Neuropathic pain is caused by dysfunction to the nervous system and may be described as a burning or shooting pain. Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by pain all over the body, fatigue, sleeping problems and psychological distress. Chronic low back pain is constant or fluctuating back pain that persists for more than three months. It can lead to difficulty with normal daily activities and psychological distress.

Treatment

Treatment varies depending on the cause of the pain and may not always include medication. Education, exercise, and psychological therapies may be part of the management strategy. In addition, medications may be given to reduce pain and enable participation in normal daily activities.

Medications used for persistent pain include:

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
  • Amitriptyline (Elavil)
  • Carbamazepine (Tegretol)
  • Celecoxib (Celebrex)
  • Desipramine
  • Diclofenac (Cambia)
  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta)
  • Gabapentin (Neurontin)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Jurnista)
  • Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
  • Lamotrigine (Lamictal)
  • Meloxicam (Mobicox)
  • Morphine (Kadian, M-Eslon, Statex)
  • Naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan, Naprosyn)
  • Nortriptyline (Aventyl)
  • Oxcarbazepine (Trileptal)
  • Pregabalin (Lyrica)
  • Venlafaxine (Effexor)

Prevention of NSAID induced ulcers

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are valuable medications for treating pain and inflammation in a number of conditions, including arthritis and low back pain. However, NSAIDs can irritate the stomach and cause ulcers or bleeding. If people are at high risk of this happening (also taking blood thinners or other medications that cause bleeding), there are medications available to protect the stomach.

Medications to prevent ulcers include:

  • Esomeprazole
  • Famotidine
  • Lansoprazole
  • Misoprostol
  • Nizatidine
  • Omeprazole
  • Pantoprazole
  • Rabeprazole
  • Ranitidine

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a type of arthritis that is caused when your body’s immune system mistakenly attacks your joints. This is a long-term inflammatory disorder that causes painful swelling and stiffness of the joints. Eventually, bones can wear away and the affected joints can change shape, which can make it hard to move those parts of the body. Rheumatoid arthritis may also affect organs and other body systems.

Treatment

It is important to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis and begin treatment early on, so that medications can be started before there is lasting damage to joints and organs. Although there is no cure, medications can help improve the stiffness, pain, and swelling and make it easier to live a normal life. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS) are used soon after diagnosis to help slow the progression of rheumatoid arthritis, but sometimes several medications will need to be tried before finding one that works the best for you.

Medications used for rheumatoid arthritis include:

  • Methotrexate
  • Sulfasalazine (Salazopyrin)
  • Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)
  • Leflunomide (Arava)
  • Rituximab (Rituxan)
  • Adalimumab (Humira)
  • Etanercept (Enbrel)
  • Golimumab (Simponi)
  • Infliximab (Remicade)

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, also known as COPD, is a disease that makes it hard to breath. Often people with COPD cough, wheeze, have shortness of breath, and their chest feels tight.

When a person has COPD, less air flows in and out of the airways. Most people with COPD have a mixture of emphysema and chronic bronchitis. In people with emphysema, damage to the walls of the lungs reduces the exchange of gas between the lungs and the blood stream. In people with chronic bronchitis, the lining of the lungs is irritated and inflamed, causing mucus to form. This mucus makes it hard for the person to breath.

Treatment

Treating COPD and changing your lifestyle can help you feel better, stay more active, and slow the progress of the disease. People with COPD sometimes experience a sudden worsening of their symptoms, called an “acute exacerbation” of COPD. People are defined as having “stable” COPD if their symptoms are either staying the same or gradually getting worse.

TreatGx gives options for medications for those people who are experiencing an acute exacerbation and a separate set of options for those with “stable” COPD.

Medications for an acute exacerbation of COPD include:

  • Amoxicillin (Amox)
  • Azithromycin (Zithromax)
  • Cefprozil (Cefzil)
  • Cefuroxime axetil (Ceftin)
  • Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
  • Clarithromycin (Biaxin)
  • Doxycycline (Doxycin, Vibramycin)
  • Levofloxacin
  • Moxifloxacin (Avelox)
  • Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole (Sulfatrim, Trimel)
  • Prednisone

Medications for stable COPD include:

  • Short-acting beta2-agonists
  • Salbutamol (Ventolin, Airomir)
  • Terbutaline (Bricanyl)
  • Short-acting anticholinergic
  • Ipratropium (Atrovent)
  • Long-acting beta2-agonists
  • Salmeterol (Serevent)
  • Formoterol fumarate dehydrate (Zenhale)
  • Formoterol fumarate (Foradil)
  • Indacaterol (Onbrez)
  • Long-acting anticholinergic
  • Tiotropium (Spiriva)
  • Inhaled Corticosteroids
  • Fluticasone Propionate (Advair, Flovent)
  • Beclomethasone dipropionate (Qvar)
  • Budesonide (Pulmicort)
  • Theophylline (Theo, Uniphyl)

Urinary Tract Infection

A urinary tract infection is an infection caused by bacteria within any portion of the urinary system. When it is located in the bladder it is called cystitis; symptoms may include painful urination and frequent urination. If the kidneys are infected, it is called pyelonephritis and is usually accompanied with fever or back pain.

Treatment

Urinary tract infections are treated with antibiotics to resolve symptoms and prevent complications. A urine test may be needed to identify the infecting organism and to ensure that the prescribed antibiotic will work.

Medications used for urinary tract infections include:

  • Amoxicillin/Clavulanate (Clavulin)
  • Ampicillin
  • Cefixime (Suprax)
  • Cefotaxime (Clarforan)
  • Ceftazidime (Fortaz)
  • Ceftriaxone
  • Cephalexin (Kelfex)
  • Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)
  • Fosfomycin (Monurol)
  • Gentamicin
  • Levofloxacin
  • Nitrofurantoin (MacroBID)
  • Norfloxacin
  • Ofloxacin
  • Piperacillin/Tazobactam (Tazocin)
  • Tobramycin (Tobi)
  • Trimethoprim
  • Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole (Sulfatrim, Trimel)

Conditions covered by TreatGx

For the full list of medications that TreatGx covers, please visit our desktop website.

Anxiety Disorders
Asthma
Atrial Fibrillation
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Depression
Diabetes (Type 2)
Epilepsy
Gout
Heart Failure – Chronic
Heart Failure – Fluid Retention
High Cholesterol (Hyperlipidemia)
High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)
Migraine
Osteoarthritis
Osteoporosis
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Persistent Pain
Prevention of NSAID-Induced Ulcers
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Urinary Tract Infections